Helping Your Child with Anxiety
Information & Resources

Internet Resources

 

Websites with information on Child Anxiety

 


Online Referral Lists

 

If you are unable to find a treatment provider through this or other websites, you should:
 
  • Contact the psychiatry department at a local medical school or a university psychology department.
  • Contact your county mental health department, a local hospital or community mental health center and ask about mental health clinics or staff psychiatrists.
  • Search through your insurance company for local behavioral health or psychiatry providers. 
  • Search the American Psychological Association provider database

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Books That May Be Helpful For Parents

The Coping Cat: Parent companion. Ardmore, PA: Workbook Publishing

Kendall, P.C., Podell, J., & Gosch, E. (2010)

The highly sensitive child: Helping children thrive when the world overwhelms them. Three Rivers Press
Aron, E. (2002)

Freeing your child from obsessive compulsive disorder: A powerful, practical program for parents of children and adolescents. Three Rivers Press
Chansky, T. (2001)

Freeing your child from anxiety: Powerful, practical solutions to overcome your child's fears, worries and phobia. Broadway Books
Chansky, T. (2004)

Freeing your child from negative thinking: Powerful, practical strategies to build a lifetime of resilience, flexibility and happiness. Da Capo Lifelong Books
Chansky, T. (2008)

OCD in children and adolescents: A cognitive-behavioral treatment manual. Guilford Press
March, J.S. & Mulle K. (1998)

Your anxious child: How parents and teachers can relieve anxiety in children. Jossey-Bass
Dacey, J. & Fiore L. (2001)

The highly sensitive child: Helping our children thrive when the world overwhelms them. Three Rivers Press
Arons, E.N. (2002)

Helping your child overcome separation anxiety or school refusal: A step-by-step guide for parents. New Harbinger Publications
Eisen, A.R., Engler, L.B., & Sparrow, J. (2006)

The worried child: Recognizing anxiety in children and helping them heal. Hunter House
Foxman, P. (2004)

Help for worried kids: How your child can conquer anxiety & fear. Guilford Press
Last, C. (2006)

Helping your anxious child: A step-by-step guide for parents. New Harbinger Productions
Rapee, R. Spence, S. Cobham, V., & Wignall, A. (2008)

What to do when your child has obsessive-compulsive disorder: Strategies and solutions. Lighthouse Press
Wagner, A.P. (2002)

Suggestions to Help Intervention

Think Exposure Tasks!

Considering CBT with anxious youth? Think exposures.
Kendall, P., Robin, J., Hedtke, K., Suveg, C., Flannery-Schroeder, E., & Gosch, E. (2005)
Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 12, 136–150.

  • When considering what to do about distressing anxiety….”Think Exposures”
 

The Power of Non-Negative Thinking

The role of self-statements as a mediator in treatment for youth with anxiety disorders

Kendall, P. C., & Treadwell, K. R. H. (2007)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75(3), 380–9.

  • Changes in children’s self-talk helps explain how to overcome anxiety.
 

Safety Seeking and Exposure Tasks

Safety-seeking and coping behavior during exposure tasks with anxious youth

Hedtke, K. a, Kendall, P. C., & Tiwari, S. (2009)
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 38(1), 1–15.

  • Coping with anxiety, not seeking safety, can be beneficial.
 

Anxiety and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Anxiety disorders in typically developing youth: Autism spectrum symptoms as a predictor of cognitive-behavioral treatment

Puleo, C. M., & Kendall, P. C. (2011)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(3), 275–86.

  • Involving parents, and homework, facilitates anxiety reduction for youth with ASD.
 

Try Not to Be “Over” Involved

Parental responses to positive and negative emotions in anxious and non-anxious children

Hudson, J. L., Comer, J. S., & Kendall, P. C. (2008)
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37(2), 303–13.

  • Giving your child some control—mothers’ not solving matters for the anxious children—may be helpful.
 

“Transferring control” can be Helpful

Exploring the role of parent training in the treatment of childhood anxiety

Khanna, M. S. & Kendall, P. C. (2009)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(5), 981–6.

  • It’s a good idea for parents to grant some control to their children, and to learn some skills to manage their own anxiety
 

Smoothing the Trail: Being Flexible While Following the Manual

Smoothing the trail for dissemination of evidence-based practices for youth: Flexibility within fidelity

Kendall, P. C., & Beidas, R. S. (2007)
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38(1), 13–20.

  • Considerations of ways to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based practice in community settings.

 

Parents Can Help Children Regulate Their Emotions

“I’d rather not talk about it”: Emotion parenting in families of children with an anxiety disorder

Suveg, C., Sood, E., Barmish, A., Tiwari, S., Hudson, J. L., & Kendall, P. C. (2008)
Journal of Family Psychology, 22(6), 875–84.

  • How emotions are explained and addressed by parents can help youth manage anxiety.

 

Flexible Applications of the Coping Cat Program

Flexible applications of the Coping Cat Program for anxious youth

Beidas, R. S., Benjamin, C. L., Puleo, C. M., Edmunds, J. M., & Kendall, P. C. (2010)
Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 17(2), 142–153.

  • Describes ways to implement treatment, with flexibility, to reach different youth.

 

Flexibility Within Fidelity

Flexibility within fidelity

Kendall, P. C., Gosch, E., Furr, J. M., & Sood, E. (2008)
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 47(9), 987–93.

  • Considers and describes the essential features of effective treatment for youth anxiety.

 

The FEAR Plan Comes to Life

The Coping Cat Program for anxious youth: The FEAR plan comes to life

Podell, J. L., Mychailyszyn, M., Edmunds, J., Puleo, C. M., & Kendall, P. C. (2010)
Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 17(2), 132–141.

  • Describes a flexible application of problem-solving (FEAR plan) with anxious youth.

 

Not to Be Concerned: Exposure Tasks Are OK

In-session exposure tasks and therapeutic alliance across the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders

Kendall, P. C., Comer, J. S., Marker, C. D., Creed, T. A., Puliafico, A. C., Hughes, A. A., Martin, E. D., et al. (2009)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(3), 517–525.

  • The therapeutic alliance, as viewed by the child, the therapist, the mother, and the father, is not damaged by the implementation of exposure tasks.

Finding Treatment Providers

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